Mountains Of Travel Photos
Home | Everest References | Contact 

The classic view of Mount Everest is from Kala Pattar, with the South Col to the right of Everest, and then Lhotse and Nuptse.

Everest, Lhotse and Nuptse from Kala Pattar in Nepal.. (click to enlarge)


Everest close up from Kala Pattar with the North Face on the left, the Hillary Step in the middle right and the South Summit on the right.

Everest close up from Kala Pattar with the North Face on the left, the Hillary Step in the middle right and the South Summit on the right. (click to enlarge)


The snow plume of Everest burns bright with the last rays of sunset from Gorak Shep.

The snow plume of Everest burns bright with the last rays of sunset from Gorak Shep. (click to enlarge)


Everest close up from Knobby View north of Gokyo.

Everest close up from Knobby View north of Gokyo. (click to enlarge)


Mount Everest North and Southwest faces burn red at sunset from Gokyo Ri.

Mount Everest North and Southwest faces burn red at sunset from Gokyo Ri. (click to enlarge)


Everest North Face glistens in the morning sun with Rongbuk Monastery (4976m) in the foreground in October 2010. The mountain in front of Everest is Changtse (7583m, Everest north peak) and the long Everest West Ridge leads to the right with Nuptse (7861m) behind at the far right.

Everest North Face glistens in the morning sun with Rongbuk Monastery (4976m), Changtse and the long Everest West Ridge leading to Nuptse. (click to enlarge)


Everest North Face close up in the afternoon from Rongbuk in October 2010. The famous second step is on the ridge to the left while the Great (Norton) Couloir comes down the face to the left and the Hornbein Couloir is on the right.

Everest North Face from Rongbuk. The second step is on the ridge to the left, the Great Norton Couloir comes down the face to the left and the Hornbein Couloir on the right. (click to enlarge)


The light on Mount Everest North Face changed from white to a golden yellow just minutes before sunset, seen from Rongbuk in October 2010.

The light on Mount Everest North Face changed from white to a golden yellow just minutes before sunset, seen from Rongbuk. (click to enlarge)


In October 1998 I trekked through the Karta Valley to the East Kangshung Face of Everest. It was a beautiful trek and the east face is dramatically different from the South-West and North faces. Here is a view of the snow clad east faces of Lhotse and Everest.

In October 1998 I trekked through the Karta Valley to the East Kangshung Face of Everest and the east face of Lhotse. (click to enlarge)


Here's a close up of Nuptse, Everest and Lhotse from the Mountain Flight from Kathmandu.

Here's a close up of Nuptse, Everest and Lhotse from the Mountain Flight from Kathmandu. (click to enlarge)


Sunrise On Shartse II, Lhotse Shar Middle And Main, Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit

Sunrise On Shartse II, Lhotse Shar Middle And Main, Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit (click to enlarge)


Sunrise On Lhotse Shar, Lhotse Middle And Lhotse Main From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit

Sunrise On Lhotse Shar, Lhotse Middle And Lhotse Main From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit (click to enlarge)


Sunrise On The Pinnacles And Mount Everest North Face Summit From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit

Sunrise On The Pinnacles And Mount Everest North Face Summit From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit (click to enlarge)


Sunrise On Shartse II, Lhotse Shar Middle And Main, Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit

Sunrise On Shartse II, Lhotse Shar Middle And Main, Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit (click to enlarge)


Sunrise On Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit, North Col And Changtse From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit

Sunrise On Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit, North Col And Changtse From The Climb From Lhakpa Ri Camp I To The Summit (click to enlarge)


Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit Early Morning On The Climb To Lhakpa Ri Summit

Mount Everest Northeast Ridge, Pinnacles And Summit Early Morning On The Climb To Lhakpa Ri Summit (click to enlarge)

Updated: November 2014. Click on an image to see the FULL size with a caption.


Mount Everest / Chomolungma - 8850m

Mount Everest (8850m, 29035ft) is the highest mountain in the world. The summit ridge of the mountain marks the border between Nepal and Tibet.

Height: The official height of Mount Everest was calculated  to be 8848m (29,028 ft) in 1954. In 1999 the American Everest Expedition used GPS to recalculate the height to be 8850m. In 2005 the Chinese Everest Expedition Team used complicated measurement and calculation to measure the height of Everest to be 8844.43 m (29,017.07 ft). This new height is based on the actual highest point of rock and not on the snow and ice that sits on top of that rock on the summit. Mount Everest is still growing in height by a few centimetres each year as the India plate slides under the Asian plate.

Name: Peak XV of the Indian Survey was named Mount Everest by Sir Andrew Waugh, the British surveyor-general of India, who named it after his predecessor, Sir George Everest.  In Nepal, the mountain is called Sagarmatha (Forehead of the Sky) and in Tibetan Chomolungma or Qomolangma (Mother of the Universe),


Here is a Google Earth image of the trekking routes in the Solu Khumbu Mount Everest region of Nepal. Treks normally start in Lukla, trekking to Namche Bazaar, Tengboche, Dingboche, Chukung, Lobuche, Kala Pattar, and Everest Base Camp. Side trips can be made to Thame and Gokyo.

Here is a Google Earth image of the drive from Tingri, over the Pang La, and on to Rongbuk Monastery and the Everest North Base Camp.

Here is a Google Earth image of the trek from Kharta over the Shao La, up the Kama Valley to the Everest Kangshung East base Camp, and then back to Kharta over the Langma La.

Everest Trekking Routes In Nepal and Tibet

I trekked to the Everest Southwest Face in the Solu-Khumbu area of Nepal three times. In 1997, I flew to Lukla and trekked to Namche Bazaar, Tengboche, Dingboche, Chukung, Lobuche, and Kala Pattar.

In 2000, I flew to Lukla and trekked to Gokyo, Tengboche, Dingboche, Lobuche, Gorak Shep, and Everest Base Camp.

In 2008, I trekked from the Rolwaling Valley over the Tashi Lapcha pass to Thame, over the Renjo La to Gokyo, over the Cho La to Gorak Shep and to Kala Pattar, over the Kongma La from Lobuche to Dingboche, and back to Lukla.

In 1998, 2005 and 2010 we drove to the Everest North Face.

In 1998 we drove from Kathmandu to Kharta and trekked to the rarely visited Everest Kangshung East Face.

In 2014 we drove once again from Kathmandu to the Norrth Face, and then trekked to Intermediate and Advanced Base Camp 6400m. I then climbed Lhakpa Ri 7001.


Youtube Videos - Everest North Face and Rongbuk Monastery, Cho Oyu and Mount Everest from Tingri in Tibet, Everest from Mera Peak, Landing and taking off from Lukla in Nepal

 

Sunrise And Early Morning views including Lhotse Shar, Lhotse Middle, Peak 38, Shartse II, Makalu, South Col, North Col, Changtse, Cho Oyu, Gyachung Kang, Siguang Ri, Changzheng Peak

 

Mount Everest North Face at sunrise, morning, afternoon and sunset. Rongbuk Monastery: statue of Padmasambhava and wall paintings of the four Guardian Kings, the Lord Of The Dance, Heruka, lion-hearted Dakini

 

360 degree mountain view from the Tingri, Tibet includes Mount Everest, Gyachung Kang, Cho Oyu, Nangpai Gosum I, Nangpa La, Jobo Rabzang, and Lobuche Kang

 

Kangtega, Cho Oyu, Gyanchung Kang. Pumori, Ama Dablam, Nuptse, Mount Everest, Lhotse Main Middle Shar, Shartse, Baruntse, Kangchungtse, Makalu, Chamlang, Kangchenjunga and Jannu.



The last photo of George Mallory and Sandy Irvine, as they prepare to leave the North Col on June 6, 1924 for Everest summit attempt

Mallory and Irvine

On June 8, 1924, George Mallory and Andrew Irvine made an attempt on the summit from which they never returned. Noel Odell, the expedition's geologist, saw the pair climbing up "with great alacrity... near the base of the final pyramide" [sic] at 12:50pm that day.

In 1999 the Mallory and Irvine Research Expedition found Mallory's body, fueling lots of discussion and theories about whether they may have died after reaching the summit.


Everest First Ascent - Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay on the Everest Southeast Ridge at 8320m on their way to Camp IX on May 28, 1953

Everest First Ascent - Sir Edmund Hillary's photo of the Everest summit ridge, including the Hillary Step, from the Everest South Summit on May 29, 1953

Tenzing Norgay On Everest Summit on May 29, 1953 - Everest First Ascent

Everest First Ascent

In 1953, a ninth British expedition, led by John Hunt, returned to Nepal. Hunt selected two climbing pairs to attempt to reach the summit. The first pair turned back after becoming exhausted high on the mountain. The next day, the expedition made its second and final assault on the summit with its fittest and most determined climbing pair. The summit was eventually reached at 11:30 am local time on May 29, 1953 by the New Zealander Edmund Hillary and Sherpa Tenzing Norgay climbing the South Col Route.

Hillary: “I had carried my camera, loaded with colour film, inside my shirt to keep it warm, so I now produced it and got Tenzing to pose for me on the top, waving his ice-axe on which was a string of flags—British, Nepalese, United Nations, and Indian. Then I turned my attention to the great stretch of country lying below us.”

Other Notable Everest Ascents

On May 25, 1960 the first successful ascent of the Everest North Face was made by a Chinese team consisting of Wang Fuzhou, Qu Yinhua and a Tibetan, Gingbu (Konbu) using the North Ridge.

On October 8, 1983, Americans Lou Reichardt, Kim Momb, and Carlos Buhler made the first ascent of the Everest Kangshung East Face.

On May 23, 1963 Tom Hornbein and Willi Unsoeld successfully climbed to the Everest Summit via the extremely difficult Everest West Ridge. They then traversed the mountain and descended via the South Col route, having to bivouac near the summit without any food, supplemental oxygen, or shelter.

On September 24, 1975 Doug Scott and Dougal Haston made the firs tascent of the Everest Southwest face on a large British expedition led by Chris Bonington.

On May 8, 1978 Reinhold Messner and Peter Habeler completed the first ascent of Mount Everest without oxygen, via the normal Nepalese southeast route.

On August 20, 1980 Reinhold Messner completed the first solo ascent of Mount Everest without oxygen via Tibet's North Face.

On May 12, 1988 Stephen Venables climbed a new route on the Everest Kangshung Face, up the South Buttress to reach the South Col, and then to the summit.

In May 1996 12 people died on Mount Everest, including guides Rob Hall and Scott Fisher, sparking wide publicity and raising questions about the commercialization of Everest. Journalist Jon Krakauer, on assignment from Outside magazine, was in on Hall's team, and afterwards published the bestseller Into Thin Air which related his experience. Anatoli Boukreev, a guide who didn't come off well in Krakauer's book, co-authored a rebuttal book called The Climb.